How best to transfer to Monaco for the 2017 Grand Prix

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Wondering how to get to this weekend's Monaco Grand Prix? We compare car, train, boat and helicopter flights to help you choose the best Grand Prix transport.

The French Riviera is famous for its high-profile events, but few are as internationally celebrated as the Monaco Grand Prix. This racing extravaganza is one of the most eagerly anticipated races in the Formula 1 calendar and visitors flock to the Principality to experience the action first hand.

Fortunately, you don’t need to be a huge fan of motor racing to enjoy the occasion, since the glamour and excitement of the event is an inimitable experience in itself. In 2017, the Monaco Grand Prix will take place on 25th-28th May. The race is set to be another outstanding event that will attract the international jet set for a weekend of exclusive parties and celebrations. The best way to arrive on the Cote d’Azur is to fly into Nice International Airport; but with large crowds expected in the Principality, transferring between plane and hotel should be given thought. So what is the best way to transfer to the Monaco Grand Prix 2017?

Arriving by Car and Train

Since the Monaco Grand Prix is hosted on the streets of the Principality, access by road is limited and parking is almost non-existent near the track. Visitors usually park at Fontvieille (Stade Louis II) and walk to the track. At less busy times, the train is a sensible way to reach Monaco from Nice. The station is centrally located, the journey takes approximately 30 minutes and the trains are frequent. However, during the Grand Prix weekend, the station is crowded and chaotic and the trains are exceptionally busy, especially on the way back.

Arriving by Boat

There is an option to take a ferry to Monaco from Nice, which is relaxing and scenic but not very fast. Some people choose to charter a superyacht and arrive in Port Hercules from a local marina, before watching the event from the yacht’s deck. This option is more luxurious than arriving by car, but not really convenient unless you’re on holiday and have lots of time. It’s a great way to watch the race, though, as you get to smell the burning rubber and hear the roar of the engines while enjoying the five-star comfort of a luxury vessel. Several cruise lines offer Mediterranean cruises in May, which include race-day tickets to the Monaco Grand Prix.

(Picture copyright of Monacair)

Arriving by Helicopter

For international visitors travelling to the Monaco Grand Prix from Nice Airport, the best way to travel is by helicopter. This way, you can avoid the intense road traffic and sheer volume of people trying to get to the Principality. Helicopter travel is surprisingly affordable in the South of France: the Regular Line (Nice to Monaco) starts from as little as €130. A helicopter from Nice to Monaco is by far the most convenient and stress-free way to get to the Grand Prix without delays.

The trip duration is 7 minutes and includes a two-way shuttle service to the departure helipad and from the Monaco heliport to your final destination. Monacair is located in all three terminals of the Nice Côte d’Azur Airport (national, international and business aviation) to ensure the best service and quickest embarkation. The flights take off from Nice and Monaco every 15 minutes, with 50 flights per day. It’s a relaxing way to travel and you might be able to catch a glimpse of the legendary race track against the glistening Mediterranean from up above – the scenery from the air is spectacular! Most importantly, however, you’ll have more time to enjoy the race and the celebratory parties that bring the Principality to life over the course of the event. Private charter flights are also available, should you wish to explore the region from the skies.

The Fast Lane is in the Sky

There’s no contest when it comes to reaching the Monaco Grand Prix with speed, minimal fuss and maximum comfort; emulate the glamour with which the Principality is so famously associated by arriving by helicopter.

Written by Zahra Pettican

Article courtesy of Relevance